Tag Archives: writing

My First Month of Book Promotion: What I’ve Learned (Re-blogged from Niels Saunders).

A really informative post from Niels Saunders, for anyone who is about to start, or who has already started to try and promote their book. A host of different options!

Niels Saunders

First Month of Self Promotion I’ve been a busy bee

Just over a month ago, I self-published my novel Mervyn vs. Dennis on Amazon. A lot’s happened since then and I’ve been much busier than I expected. Here’s a fairly self-congratulatory list of the things I’ve managed to do in 5 weeks:

  • Design my cover
  • Buy a pineapple
  • Buy a larger pineapple from a different supermarket because the first one looked a bit pathetic and not bristly enough
  • Take a load of profile pictures
  • Eat both pineapples
  • Format my manuscript for Kindle and other devices
  • Write a new blurb (this actually took hours)
  • Completely redo my cover because I’d done the whole thing in the wrong size
  • Write a bio
  • Create an author site for Amazon
  • Buy a domain name and create my own website
  • Revamp my personal Twitter account into a more authory one
  • Write my first 4 blogs
  • Feed the cat

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New Book!

I’m really pleased to announce that yesterday I published the sequel to The Mouse and the Microlight as an e-book on Amazon. It’s called The Stowaways. I originally wrote both books as blogs, putting up a chapter a week with illustrations. I decided some time ago that they would convert very well to e-books and went ahead with The Mouse and the Microlight. It worked well and so I set about doing the same for The Stowaways (originally called ‘When the Hangar Came Down’). A complete edit was needed, all the artworks improved and resized, a table of content created and of course a cover which is always a favourite job.

This is about the book as published on Amazon:

The Stowaways is the second book by Jude Thompson about Mouse Formidable. In the first book, The Mouse and the Microlight, Mouse Formidable refuses to follow wood-mouse ways. He moves into a barn and builds a nest under the back seat of a microlight. He’s accepted by the couple who own it and he starts to go flying with them.

The Stowaways find Mouse Formidable getting home one day to find his beloved flying machine gone. And then the Louds (the name wood-mice have given humans) start dismantling his barn. With his whole world collapsing he stows away in their car and travels with the Louds into their world. Little does he know that someone is travelling with him. At the Louds house fantastic discoveries are made, but then Formidable is caught in a trap. Will he be found before it’s too late, and will he ever go flying again? In the meantime, many miles away, back in the wood where he was born, a fire starts. Mouse Formidable’s family are in terrible danger. With nowhere to run who will save them? The Stowaways is is a story of exploration, discovery, daring and friendship.

My next project, now that all my books are published e-books, is to go for paperbacks. It may take a while as all the e-book files have to be converted and made suitable for book publishing. Lots of research and trial an error I think! More about this in a later post.

Lastly a BIG thank you to those of you who have bought The Mouse and the Microlight!

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Traditional Publishing versus Self-Publishing

Revived Post from 2011

*I wrote this post (now slightly edited) back in 2011. It’s rather interesting for me rereading it now. Looking back I’m still glad that I went the e-book route as opposed to continuing down the traditional route.

 

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The Traditional Route

In March 2008 I completed what I suppose is technically a memoir, then it festered in a drawer for nearly three years while I winged the standard synopsis and sample chapters off to publishers. To me the very word memoir is off-putting. It conjures up pictures of a white-haired old man relating his war experiences in a somewhat starched  and stuffy style. So when I approached publishers during that three years I avoided using it and instead I called it a True Romantic Adventure. It made no difference, I still got the standard pleasant and complimentary rejections. To get a personal story published I think you really need to be a celebrity of some sort.

Thousands of writers follow the same well-worn path of rejection, and not just for memoirs. It matters not what your genre is, it’s still a laborious and often disheartening task trying to get published, however dogged you are. A fact which also causes some concern is that some books which are now world-famous were turned down by dozens of publishers before eventually being accepted. I read recently that Zen and the Art of Motor-cycle Maintenance was turned down 121 times before it was accepted. So even if you are a good writer it could take donkeys years to get published. And even worse, what if your book was eventually published and sold like crazy after you had died; wouldn’t that cheese you right off!

Fortunately for me and a lot of other authors the age of the e-book is seriously with us now. It gives us all a long-awaited and sporting chance to sell our chosen genre. At last the author has some control. As one writer recently put it, ‘The Kindle (and other e-Readers) allows you to publish your work and let the people decide – democracy in action!